Suffer no foolishness

Randall Franks

Do you ever find yourself looking around wondering what happened to the world around you? The lenses through which you have looked at life become skewed by some new information you learn, the action of another, or simply a mistake that you have made yourself. A blurred focus is something that if allowed to taint one’s life, it can bring worry, sadness, and even a loss of direction, especially if the offense is serious enough and comes from a source that we rely upon as pillar of our lives. No man or woman walks down his or her path without mistakes. The measure of a person however is whether they are able to own those mistakes and make strides to fix what they have broken. At times in my life I have found myself worrying over the actions of another towards me. Sometimes these people were the center of my humanly world at that given moment. No matter how much time I spent locked in a sense of desiring to fix it, I couldn’t do it. In most cases, if I had made the mistake, I made the effort to apologize and then it was left to them to decide. If they made the mistake, sometimes they really didn’t have the desire to fix it. Perhaps they were to prideful to admit they were wrong; perhaps they felt it was the appropriate time to let go and leave the relationship in the past. In my earliest years on the earth, I quickly learned that there are others that feel bigger by hurting another emotionally. There was a point in my life though that my experiences brought me to the epiphany that I did not have to suffer the foolishness of others especially those not my kin. So after a certain point, if I felt someone I considered important to me in some way wronged me, I brought it to their attention and left it to them to decide whether I was worth their time to fix it. If they didn’t, I forgave them, and wasted no more time with them. When I have made mistakes that impact someone other than myself, even by accident in word or deed, I know I have debated internally the proper way to apologize and to make amends. Sometimes I do wonder if I am more concerned with things of this nature more than others. At times, I have let something dominate my freethinking time. I hoped to be able to clear that thought with an apology. The other person may not even have taken offense, but until I have the chance to set it right in my thinking, I was unsettled. Ultimately, I hoped to discover that it was all for naught. Nevertheless, it just reminds me as we walk this path that we have been given to trod, all of us make mistakes that may hurt others without intention. We must be ever mindful that we are to make life here better for one another, not worse. I pray each day for the wisdom to treat others, as I would like to be treated. I can only hope that each person I meet is praying for the same. What have you prayed for today?

Randall Franks played Officer Randy Goode (1988–1993) Randy Goode begins his work on the series as a partner to Wilson Sweet in "The Creek"; he soon begins driving Chief Gillespie and Detective Tibbs around.

Randall has stayed a good friend of The Courier for many years.

The actor recently took a fall and is still recovering. We hope he continues to improve. Our thoughts and prayers are with him. —Jim Clark, publisher courierL@bellsouth.net

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